nastycomix:

Sadao Hasegawa

nastycomix:

Sadao Hasegawa

(via ifiwereblue)

kitdraydur:

Taken….no doubt

kitdraydur:

Taken….no doubt

(via lknmn)

mrwilldude:

Beautiful replay

mrwilldude:

Beautiful replay

(via gayosiris-haus-o-ass)

dotroom:

Simple thing

dotroom:

Simple thing

(via pejankovs67)

vispreeve:

Tyler Posey | The Ellen DeGeneres Show, October 2014

ariesascending:

barsanworld:

sara-white:

Artwork with a dreamy feel by Brooks Salzwedel.


(via sara-white)

ariesascending:

barsanworld:

sara-white:

Artwork with a dreamy feel by Brooks Salzwedel.

(via sara-white)

(via nolma-art)

abnormals:

vintagegaymale:

1975

ROCK STEAM!!

abnormals:

vintagegaymale:

1975

ROCK STEAM!!

(via mikestand)


This crater, 'The Sedan Crater', remains from the Plowshares program, the purpose of which was to test the peaceful use of nuclear explosions. The operating hypothesis was that a nuclear explosion could easily excavate a large area, facilitating the building of canals and roads, improving mining techniques, or simply moving a large amount of rock and soil. The intensity and distribution of radiation proved too great, and the program was abandoned. The “Sedan” device was thermonuclear—70 percent fusion, 30 percent fission—with a yield of 100 kilotons. The crater is an impressive 635 feet deep and 1,280 feet wide. The weight of the material lifted was 12 million tons.[Taken from the book Nuclear Landscapes, by Peter Goin]

This crater, 'The Sedan Crater', remains from the Plowshares program, the purpose of which was to test the peaceful use of nuclear explosions. The operating hypothesis was that a nuclear explosion could easily excavate a large area, facilitating the building of canals and roads, improving mining techniques, or simply moving a large amount of rock and soil. The intensity and distribution of radiation proved too great, and the program was abandoned. The “Sedan” device was thermonuclear—70 percent fusion, 30 percent fission—with a yield of 100 kilotons. The crater is an impressive 635 feet deep and 1,280 feet wide. The weight of the material lifted was 12 million tons.
[Taken from the book Nuclear Landscapes, by Peter Goin]

(via mfkopp)